Earth yet again sizzled with unprecedented heat last month.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday Earth sweated to its second hottest month since recordkeeping began in 1880. At 61.89 degrees (16.63 Celsius), last month was behind July 2016's all-time record by .09 degrees.But Earth's land temperatures in July were the hottest on record at 59.96 degrees (15.5 Celsius), passing July 2016's by one-seventh of a degree.Land measurements are important because that's where we live, said NOAA climate scientist Jake Crouch.Earlier this week, NASA...
As the sky does dark, robots will conduct atmospheric science. On Monday, hex drones will fly into the sky during the eclipse to measure the change in weather from the sudden darkness and the sudden cold. When the sun disappears behind the moon on Monday, scientists will be ready.